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  • Théâtre Raymond Kabbaz Presents
    Monica Casadei’s Traviata
    A Contemporary Dance Performance by Italian Company
    Artemis Danza
    Based on the Famous Opera by Verdi
    In Los Angeles
    Saturday, November 16, 2013

    LOS ANGELES, CA – October 22, 2013 – 

The performance space at Le Lycée Français de Los Angeles, Théâtre Raymond Kabbaz (TRK), is pleased to present Monica Casadei’s Traviata, a contemporary dance interpretation of the famous opera performed by Italian company Artemis Danza, on Saturday, November 16, 2013.  Traviata is based on Giuseppe Verdi’s famous opera La Traviata, translated into the language of dance by eclectic choreographer Casedei.  The opera tells the doomed story of upper class prostitute Violetta, who sacrifices herself for love.  The show will start at 7:30pm and will take place at Théâtre Raymond Kabbaz, 10361 W. Pico Blvd., Los Angeles CA 90064 (310-286-0553).  Tickets are $25 for adults and $15 for students.   Tickets can be purchased here.  Beverages will be available for purchase.  This event is produced in partnership with the Italian Cultural Institute in Los Angeles.  For more information, please visit the event page on TRK’s site here.  View the Facebook event page here.  To learn more about Théâtre Raymond Kabbaz, please visit http://www.theatreraymondkabbaz.com.


    Traviata
    is one of three chapters in a larger Casadei project inspired by Verdi and co-produced by Verdi Festival: Progetto Verdi – Trittico.  The project translates the great Italian composer’s work into the language of dance.  In addition to Traviata, Casadei’s project also features Rigoletto and La Doppia Notte – Aida e Tristan.  In her creations, Casadei follows Verdi’s music “hand to hand.”  Through the vigorous and energetic gestures that characterize Casadei’s visual vocabulary, the dancers’ bodies absorb the passion, distress, and dramatic ending of the tragic love story.

    La Traviata
    La Traviata is based on Alexandre Dumas the younger’s play La Dame aux Camelias.  The Dumas play, in turn, is based on the scandalous real life of French courtesan Alphonsine “Marie” Duplessis, whom he had known and adored.  One of the most frequently performed of all operas for the immediacy of its story and beautiful melodies, La Traviata is also noted for having characterized perhaps the richest psychological inner being of all romantic opera.

    Synopsis –
    La Traviata (“The Woman Gone Astray”) is the doomed story of upper class prostitute Violetta, who sacrificed herself for love, set in 1840s Paris.  Violetta, the mistress of a wealthy baron, hosts a lavish party to celebrate her improved health after a bout with Tuberculosis.  There she meets socially respectable Alfredo and becomes smitten with him.  Violetta leaves the baron to move into a secluded country villa with Alfredo, where they live happily for a while.  But unknown to Alfredo, his father convinces Violetta that the shame of the two lovers’ relationship will prevent Alfredo’s sister from making a good marriage.  With great sadness, Violetta selflessly leaves Alfredo.  Misunderstanding her motives, Alfredo goes into a jealous rage that leads to tragic consequences.  Her golden heart broken, Violetta succumbs to illness.

    Casadei’s choreography presents the story from the perspective of Violetta, who appears in white (symbolizing pureness) as well as red (a bleeding heart, perhaps better off if it never beat).  In the dance, she is multiplied into many female characters, into many cross sections of the heart.  Evil waits in the wake of the waltz.  Behind the sparkling celebrations and polite manners lies a rotten, empty society.  Pitted against everyone, Violetta is surrounded by a chauvinistic society represented by a chorus in black.  Despised and ill, she still yearns for something pure, as she faces the end.

    Recorded music from Verdi’s original opera, arranged and modified by composer Luca Vianini with musical dramaturgy by Alessandro Taverna, will accompany the TRK performance of Traviata.

    Monica Casadei’s Traviata on YouTube:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-xxkq9HmP5Y

    Monica Casadei, Artemis Danza –
    French-bred Italian choreographer Monica Casadei is the director of Artemis Danza.  Casadei initially had a competitive career in rhythmic gymnastics then studied classical ballet and modern dance, in Italy and at The Place in London, as well as in Paris, where she moved in the late 1980s.  In Paris, choreographers Pierre Doussaint and Isabelle Doubouloz fostered her professional growth.  She was also influenced by martial arts: in Paris she attended the Académie d’Arts Martiaux et d’Arts Contemporains and attained a rank of 2nd dan in Aikido and a teaching certification at the Académie Autonome d’Aikido Kobayashi Hirokazu.

    In 1994, Casadei founded the Compagnia Artemis Danza in France and, with the company, she moved back to Italy in 1997.  From 1998 to 2007, she was in residence at the Teatro Due – Teatro Stabile of Parma and Reggio Emilia.  Artemis Danza has realized over thirty creations by Casadei, in addition to choreographies for many theatre and opera performances, the promotion of young authors, and several training initiatives.

    Théâtre Raymond Kabbaz –
    Théâtre Raymond Kabbaz (TRK) is a non-profit institution dedicated to the promotion of art and culture in the West Los Angeles area.  This 220-seat theater welcomes multidisciplinary and multicultural shows.  TRK’s mission is to be an open window on French and international cultures and to inspire and sustain a lifelong appreciation for the arts.

    Links –
    • Théâtre Raymond Kabbaz – http://www.theatreraymondkabbaz.com
    • Théâtre Raymond Kabbaz on Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/pages/Theatre-Raymond-Kabbaz/43864706321
    • Artemis Danza – http://www.artemisdanza.com

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    For more information, photos, or to schedule an interview, please contact Green Galactic’s Lynn Tejada at 213-840-1201 or lynn@greengalactic.com.

    Posted on October 24th, 2013 lynn-hasty No comments

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